APVEA2019
May 17th
(Fri)
May 18th
(Sat)
May 19th
(Sun)
May 17th (Fri)
08: 30 - 09: 1545 mins
08: 30 - 09: 1545 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Individual sessionWorkshop
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
09: 15 - 09: 4530 mins
09: 15 - 09: 4530 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
Workshop 1 Erasmus and Virtual exchange
09: 45 - 10: 3045 mins
09: 45 - 10: 3045 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
Workshop 2 Erasmus and Virtual exchange
10: 30 - 10: 4515 mins
10: 30 - 10: 4515 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Coffee and tea lovers
Individual sessionCoffee Break
10: 45 - 11: 4560 mins
10: 45 - 11: 4560 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
The explanation for the teaching instruction design and reflection on the training
11: 45 - 13: 30105 mins
11: 45 - 13: 30105 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Hungry people
Individual sessionLunch
13: 30 - 14: 1545 mins
13: 30 - 14: 1545 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
Workshop 3 Erasmus and Virtual exchange
14: 15 - 15: 1560 mins
14: 15 - 15: 1560 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
Reflection on the training
15: 15 - 15: 3015 mins
15: 15 - 15: 3015 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Coffee and tea lovers
Individual sessionCoffee Break
15: 30 - 16: 0030 mins
15: 30 - 16: 0030 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele and HDU team
Individual sessionWorkshop
16: 05 - 17: 0560 mins
16: 05 - 17: 0560 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Hagley
Individual sessionWorkshop
Do you want your students to interact with students from other countries but don't know how to organize that? Do you want your students to not only use English as an "academic" language but to use it in real-world communication? If the answer to these questions is "yes" then join this workshop to find out how your students can become part of one of the biggest language and culture learning groups in the world. The IVEProject is sponsored by the Japanese government and Muroran Institute of Technology and is free-of-charge for teachers to access with their students. Once they do, students can interact with students from other countries and use the language they are studying in class to communicate with real people in other countries in a safe environment. This workshop introduces the IVEProject which has had over 15,000 students and 200 teachers from 14 countries and 50 institutions in South America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe participating in exchanges over the last 3 years. Students interact online in English-as-a-lingua-franca using Moodle. Each exchange is 8-weeks long employing various tasks to encourage student interaction in addition to language and cultural development. You will learn how you and your students can participate in this workshop.
18: 30 - 20: 30120 mins
18: 30 - 20: 30120 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
SFLEP press
Individual sessionWorkshop
May 18th (Sat)
08:00 - 09:001 hour
08:00 - 09:001 hour
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Individual sessionWorkshop
TBA
TBA
09: 00 - 09: 4545 mins
09: 00 - 09: 4545 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Individual sessionWorkshop
09: 45 - 11: 1590 mins
09: 45 - 11: 1590 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Valls, Wu, Hagley
Individual sessionRoundtable
Virtual Exchange (VE) has many facets that need to be understood for it to succeed. Once the many facets of VE are taken into account, students can gain a great deal. This panel discussion will outline three areas that are important for teachers to appreciate as they will be a part of most VE. Having a grasp of them will also assist the teacher in preparing for VE and ensuring it is successful. The first area that will be covered is interaction strategies. These are obviously essential in any form of communication but even more so in online interactions. Students require assistance when navigating a multi-cultural environment – particularly when it is the first time for them to do so. Another area is the use of emoji. Though some may say these are of little use in real communication, it is a fact that, for many of our students, they are actually an essential part of modern communication. Perhaps teachers don't have to fully embrace them, but they do need to understand that emoji, stickers and internet memes (ESMs) are an essential part of modern communication. How they are used, and how teachers should look at them within the context of communicative events will be a point of discussion in language classes from now on. Finally, as most VE take place between classes with students from different cultures, the challenges and benefits of inter-cultural communication need to be considered. This panel discussion will endeavor to cover these issues so that participants will have a firmer understanding of these different dimensions of VE.
09: 45 - 11: 1590 mins
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11: 20 - 12: 2060 mins
11: 20 - 12: 2060 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Deardorff
Keynote speechKeynote (60 minutes)Integrating virtual exchange
While intercultural development and language learning are often key aspects of virtual exchange, VE must be more intentional about developing intercultural competence. What are the requisite criteria for developing intercultural competence in VE? What are key aspects of assessing this competence, as well as some tools that can be integrated into VE? This talk will explore these various aspects and invite further reflection within participants' own VE contexts on how to more intentionally facilitate intercultural competence development.
12: 20 - 13: 1555 mins
12: 20 - 13: 1555 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Hungry people
Individual sessionLunch
13: 15 - 13: 4025 mins
13: 15 - 13: 4025 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Ku, Kim
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Integrating virtual exchange
Understanding the target language culture is a crucial component of second language learning and the 2015 Revised Korean National Curriculum of English emphasizes intercultural competence (IC) as one of the core competencies for all levels of schools. Reflecting the importance of IC in teaching and learning English, a telecollaborative culture project was designed for upper primary school students and the students’ level of IC and integrative motivation (IM) were measured to show the effectiveness of the project in developing students’ IC and IM. A total of 281 Korean students at Year 5 and 6 in six primary schools in a metropolitan city in Korea participated in the study and they were divided into an experimental and a control group for comparison. The students in the experimental group joined in the telecollaborative culture project for 7 months from May to December,2018, sharing information on a variety of conversation topics with their Australian friends. The Fantini’s Intercultural competence scale (2007) and Gardner’s integrative orientation (1985) were modified to measure the participants’ IC and IM in learning English. Pre-task and post-task surveys were conducted with the two groups and the results showed that the students in the telecollaorative culture project developed higher levels of IC and IM and more specifically they achieved a higher score in the various elements of IC (knowledge, attitude, skills, and awareness). The findings suggest the benefits and possibilities of utilizing a telecollaborative culture project with young learners in promoting intercultural competence and integrative motivation.
13: 45 - 14: 1025 mins
13: 45 - 14: 1025 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Matsui, Van Deusen
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Using virtual exchange
This presentation will report achievements and challenges that both the students and the teachers experienced in a telecollaborative project between a Japanese university and an American university. The project was designed to have “collaborative tasks, ” which required students not only to exchange and compare information but also to work together to produce a joint product or conclusion (O’Dowd & Waire,2009). In this semester-long project, the students in groups of three to five from both universities worked collectively mainly asynchronously using Slack and in occasional synchronous sessions in Zoom to create short promotion video clips. The results from the survey, in-class discussions, as well as actual exchanges in Slack and Zoom sessions indicate that rather complicated tasks raised more logistical challenges than linguistic challenges even though the tasks were designed with expectations of promoting negotiation of meaning to reach agreement on their final products. These challenges, which include scheduling synchronous sessions and unaligned visions on the final products, will be exemplified group by group. The presentation will be concluded with suggestions for the future project, which include the importance of simplicity of the project design and sharing the same understanding at the beginning of the project.
14: 15 - 15: 1560 mins
14: 15 - 15: 1560 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Van Maele
Keynote speechKeynote (60 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
On its website, APVEA reminds us that “virtual exchanges are technology-enabled, sustained, people-to-people education programs. ” But what exactly is exchanged in virtual exchanges? What is deemed of value to participants in these exchanges? Might it be that there are interactions that could enhance this added value better than 'exchanges’? How about if we dropped ‘exchange’ and speak of virtual ‘dialogue’, for example? In order to answer this last question, we need to understand what it takes to have a dialogue. Its characteristics can be gleaned from insights in the fields of communication, business, and philosophy. Particular emphasis will be paid to dialogue as defined by Bohm (1996), and to principles of holding dialogues as described by facilitators like Isaacs (1999), Pranis (2005), and Weisbord & Janoff (2007). “Encouraging intercultural dialogue” is often named as a vital purpose of virtual exchange, as in the case of the recently established Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange initiative. Consequently, we also need to understand what makes a dialogue ‘intercultural’. This question has been addressed not only by trainers and educators (Hoffman & Verdooren 2018; Van Maele & Mertens 2014) but also at high-level international bodies such as the Council of Europe (2010) and UNESCO (2013; 2018). Once we have established a conceptually and practically relevant definition, we shall explore what can be done to create an online environment that is conducive to intercultural dialogue. To add to the conversation, I will bring in the voices of colleagues and students I have had the pleasure of working with, and I will illustrate my points with examples from several projects co-funded by the European Commission, including CEFcult (Online CEF-based assessment of oral proficiency for intercultural professional contexts) and RICH-Ed (Resources for Interculturality in Chinese Higher Education). Throughout the talk, I will encourage the participants to consider how these experiences and ideas resonate with realities and possibilities in Asian-Pacific contexts they are familiar with, and I hope to start up some dialogue of our own.
15: 15 - 15: 3015 mins
15: 15 - 15: 3015 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Coffee and tea lovers
Individual sessionCoffee Break
Coffee
15: 30 - 16: 1040 mins
15: 30 - 16: 1040 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Long, Hua
Individual sessionFull paper (40 minutes)Intercultural studies
Globalization promotes intercultural communication while the development of new media brings new opportunity and challenge to intercultural communication at the same time. Currently study on intercultural communication in China focuses on certain limited areas and disciplines while quantitative research is limited. Research on the effect of intercultural communication from the perspective of the audience is limited. This research has chosen 20 Chinese cultural symbols as key words, collected data ranging from 2010-2016 from American traditional mainstream media, mainly represented by Wall Street Journal and the New York Times, and social media, main represented by Twitter by crawler software and big-data technology. This research analyzes the effect of Chinese cultural symbols in America from the perspective of communication content and communication access. After data analysis, the following conclusions have been drawn. First, Chinese cultural symbols have not been effectively recognized; secondly, Americans’ cognition towards Chinese cultural symbols remains at a superficial level; thirdly, intercultural communication of Chinese cultural symbols on social media is more effective than on American traditional mainstream media; fourthly, the effect of Chinese cultural symbols’ communication in America is degrading over time. At last, this research has given suggestion on promotion of intercultural communication of Chinese cultural symbols in according to Integrated Marketing Communication theory. This research aims at examining the status quo of Chinese intercultural communication and coming up with practical suggestions; on the other hand, from the theoretical perspective, this research combined qualitative and quantitative methods, providing a new framework to study the effect of intercultural communication, which I believe could also be applied to VE studies, for example VE development. Furthermore, this research has included traditional communication channels(newspaper) and non-traditional communication channels(social media), which may also possibly provide aspirations for VE studies. This is an individual work for master thesis. In my presentation, I would like to mainly present my methodology, data and conclusions, as well as further implications.
15: 30 - 16: 1040 mins
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Draeger Jr
Individual sessionFull paper (40 minutes)Intercultural studies
Abstract: International EFL instructors’ experiences in Chinese classrooms are the focus of this study. Faculty from places such as the United States, Canada, United Kingdom and other countries have largely taught English as a Foreign Language for the past several decades. However, this study goes beyond EFL instruction to explore how International Teachers can influence Chinese Students’ development of Intercultural Communication. International faculty may encourage learner’s development of Intercultural Communication Competence through the introduction of learning activities (hence ICC). 14 instructors employed in China described how they either minimized or maintained cultural gaps during class time interactions. Interviewees taught at a variety of institutions in Shanghai, Xian, Zhejiang and Ningxia. Four main categories arose from interviewees comments: Explicit Closure, Personal and Mediated, General minimizing and maintaining of cultural gaps. In the discussion international teachers’ classroom interactions are understood in light of Byram’s Savoirs. Afterwards, opportunities for further study will be discussed.
16: 15 - 16: 4025 mins
16: 15 - 16: 4025 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Xia, Huang, Li
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
Intercultural Communication in English has been a school-based quality course in Hefei University. The hybrid method, a mixture of online and classroom teaching and learning, is involved to maximize learners’ participation, autonomy and thinking ability in learning intercultural communication based on materials between the Chinese and those who speak English. Based on a network teaching platform, the course has adopted learner-centered interactive flipped classroom teaching with case studies, discussions and role plays. Superstar APP is utilized in pre-class, in-class and post-class sections to improve the learners’ awareness and effectiveness of intercultural communication in terms of cultural sensitivity, inclusiveness and adaptiveness. With some examples of micro-class clips and video-clips of students’ activities in pre-class, in-class and post-class sections, the presentation will illustrate how the students are motivated to learn, to think and demonstrate what they have acquired about intercultural communication. The course aims to be learner-centered for the best benefit of the students in understanding cultural differences in communication in the Chinese culture context to learn a foreign language. Though currently without virtual exchange, the course is looking for online interactions between the learners and any English-speakers for real intercultural communication. The course is also hybrid in the teaching team, including English language teachers of varied courses from two Chinese universities. They have been trying to integrate theories and practice of intercultural communication into their own courses while lecturing respectively in the course as well. Results from questionnaires and interviews have shown a positive attitude to the course. As there is no chance for virtual exchanges involved in the teaching so far, a demand is reported from majorities of the learners for person-to-person intercultural communication via Internet or other forms.
16: 15 - 16: 4025 mins
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Individual sessionShort paper
Cultural values are the normative system that guides a society in solving societal problems and attaining societal goals (Schwartz,2006). Cultural value change, reflecting the way society functions in response to inner and outer stimulus and problems, is of great significance in understanding Chinese experience of modernization and globalization. With the momentum of globalization and modernization, China has experienced tremendous economic, social, political, and cultural transformation over the past several decades. The contemporary Chinese culture landscape, marked by the coexistence of modernization/globalization-induced values and some aspects of traditional values, is no longer as "intact" as it used to be. One particular epitome of culture change is the differences in values that has been observed between generations. Factors such as the one-child policy, higher education, and rising exposure to western media all contribute to the psychological gap between younger generation and their parents’ generation (Wang,2006). This thesis aims to gain insight into Chinese cultural change by examining cultural value differences between young people and their parents' generation using Schwartz’s Value Survey, a measure that provides a comprehensive list of value items widely recognized around the world (Schwartz,1992,1994a). A hybridized cultural paradigm, which posits the coexistence of changes in some cultural domains and stability in others, was utilized as the main theoretical framework. Based on this framework, this paper investigated value change regarding its priority and structure. Historical importance of SVS value items was also evaluated to provide further insight into value change in terms of values’ level of centrality. Finally, the correlations between values and life satisfaction in both generations were explored. Three patterns of value priority change were found. First, compared with the parents’ generation’s value preferences, the younger generation’s values are becoming more hierarchical rather than egalitarian. Second, there is an increase in autonomy and decrease in embeddedness. However, this trend is only limited to value items of low and moderate historical importance, and embeddedness elements of high historical importance remain perennial over time. Third, both generations value harmony equally. The analysis of the value structure of both generations has yielded three major findings. First, in the younger generation, value items are less spread out, and the value domain boundaries are not as clear-cut as those of their parents’ generation. Second, embeddedness forms two domains in the younger generation, but only one in their parents’ generation. Third, value items seem to form a three-region pattern in both generations from an indigenous perspective. Finally, life satisfaction has a low correlation with cultural values in parents’ generation, but shows moderate negative correlations with affective and intellectual autonomy in younger generation.
16: 45 - 17: 1025 mins
16: 45 - 17: 1025 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Wu
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Using virtual exchange
The term ‘youthquake’ is defined as political, cultural, and social changes initiated by young people in society. With the recent developments and use of social media, it is not surprising to discover that changes are also being made to the ways people communicate. As a case in point, emoji: Face with Tears of Joy was selected as the ’Word of the Year’ in 2015 by Oxford Dictionaries. This signifies that not only the young generation has moved beyond the traditional textual mode of communication and that most people are now familiar with multimodal semiotic resources enabled by various technologies, for instance, smartphones. Yet, research into the use of multimodal communication in instant messaging discourse is still an emerging field of inquiry, especially the use of emoji, stickers and internet memes (ESMs). To fill in this void, this study explores the communicative functions of ESMs sent by a teacher in a WeChat telecollaborative group. Drawing on an auto-netnography approach, data were gathered from 16-week transcripts throughout two years and then the teacher’s reflections on his use of ESMs. In this talk, I will present my methodological contributions and findings in relation to digital literacies.
17: 15 - 17: 4025 mins
17: 15 - 17: 4025 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Yamauchi, Suzuki Carlson
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Using virtual exchange
Integrating into a foreign language (FL) classrooms a Virtual Exchange (VE) using two languages, with native speakers of each language, is fairly common today. This approach is often associated with pairing up two individuals as in “eTandem. ” This presentation, however, will illustrate samples of group-to-group interactions including video clips and comments from 15 EFL learners in Japan and 10 JFL learners in the US. The students were divided into 4 groups of 3-4 students from each country and created bilingual videos for their remote partners. This was followed by written interactions. Based on pre- and post-surveys and observation, the presenters will demonstrate that this 8-week-long exchange helped reduce FL anxiety and facilitated student engagement. The amount and complexity of language used in videos and written interactions varied from student to student; however, all students stepped out of their comfort zone and gained a sense of achievement. The presentation will focus on three main key aspects of the project as successful attributes to the outcomes: asynchronous videos which is less intimidating than synchronous, bilingual video messages, and working in groups.
17: 45 - 18: 1530 mins
17: 45 - 18: 1530 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Committee Members And Others Who Want To Participate
Individual sessionRoundtable
This is the APVEA general meeting where discussion will take place on how APVEA can move forward.
18: 30 - 20: 30120 mins
18: 30 - 20: 30120 mins
Room TBA60 seats
Using virtual exchange
Individual sessionRoundtable
Yum!
May 19th (Sun)
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
09: 00 - 10: 0060 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Kulich
Keynote speechKeynote (60 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
Technology in this New Era provides unparalleled cross-border opportunities for integrating language and culture teaching in virtual environments toward cultivating interculturality. We build on a long tradition: European scholars started focusing on the comparative study of cultures (in the 1800s), Americans sought to understand and integrate the cultural background and contributions of immigrants (in the 1900s), and an early “intercultural education” movement aimed to engage students and adults in school assembly and cultural dialogue sessions (in the 1930s). Following WWII, “intercultural communication” (IC) was conceptualized and intercultural training methods developed (in the 1950s) in ways that culminated in the formation of several “intercultural” and “cross-cultural” fields (in the 1970s) which have spread around the world (entering China in the 1980s, founding CAFIC in 1995, and being included in national foreign language teaching guidelines in recent years). As language educators and cultural exchange proponents, we have been seeking to find/develop/use materials and means that expose learners to the global knowledge that facilitates greater awareness of other cultures, helps cultivate attitudes that are conducive for intercultural contact, and provides vehicles for developmental interaction across boundaries. Online learning focused on cultural self- and Other reflection (Weigl,2008? ) via cultural stories, intercultural exposure activities, and virtual interaction has great potential for accomplishing these objectives. We’ve been trying to do this, especially since 2014, when FutureLearn signed us on to develop one of the first international MOOCs focused on “intercultural communication. ” Since our first run went online in November 2015, nearly 50,000 have enrolled,26,600+ have engaged in the course,15,300 actively, with 7,400+ social learners (those replying to other’s comments, developing virtual conversations). The success of this ongoing course is evident, in that even over 7 runs, only 12% have left the course, more than 60% started, of those 60+% were active and 27% have become social learners, most showing IC development through this process of virtual interaction. Of the more than 400,000 steps completed (about 15 per each of the 5 weeks, on average one third (25 of those 75) per learner), and learners have left over 100,000 comments (on average nearly 15 per active learner per course). Apart from the MOOC, similar procedures have been used in Blackboard/Moodle online learning (Wang & Kulich,2015). Again, the development of cultural stories, the posture of an ethnographic learner, and openness to reach out to interview a culturally-different Other was shown to have an impact on learner’s development along the DMIS/IDI spectrum. Evidence suggests that such virtual course components can contribute to IC Bildung, which includes the holistic cultivation of language, social, and intercultural knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Interculturality describes the clarified personal values/identities, perspectives, and practices toward this pedagogical goal of each global citizen “becoming intercultural.
10: 05 - 11: 3590 mins
10: 05 - 11: 3590 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Dewees
Individual sessionRoundtable
Global learning skills are becoming increasingly valued in contemporary institutions of higher education and the labor market. At the same time, a number of students in colleges and universities remain unable to afford the time and cost of study abroad experiences offered through these institutions. Collaboration through virtual exchange offers a cost effective format to increase students' intercultural awareness, development as global citizens, and ability to connect individual issues to larger global phenomena. This work draws on insights from student feedback in an upper division social science course on Southeast Asia where virtual exchange is utilized for two designated assignments on critical thinking. Specifically, participants from multiple segments of the muay thai and sport tourism scene in Thailand joined the class using Adobe Connect in one hour scheduled sessions. Students were subsequently asked to present multiple viewpoints of subjects including child fighters and gender and cultural boundaries in the sport. Pedagogical questions surrounding evaluation of students in cross-cultural virtual exchange work, emotional and ethical issues which arise in these collaborations, and incorporation of these assignments into classes serving student populations coming from a strong teacher-centered approach to learning are addressed. Suggestions and strategies for dealing particularly with the personal issues such exchanges can bring up for students in connection to their own experiences and unexpected questions or occurrences which arise during live sessions of virtual connection will be sought through this session.
11: 35 - 12: 0025 mins
11: 35 - 12: 0025 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Valls Campa, Diaz Ayuga
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Intercultural studies
Research on intercultural telecollaboration projects in foreign language courses has shown that failed communication, which is a poor and/or conflictive communication between the two cultural groups of students taking part in the project, is a frequent problem. Much of the research has pointed to cultural differences between the communication styles as the main cause of failed communication. In the present paper, we analyze the occurrence and the causes of failed communication in the online forums of a project that we carried out between students in the Department of Hispanic Studies at a Japanese University and students of Japanese at a Japanese culture center in Spain. In the analysis, we consider, on the one hand, the different interaction strategies, the moment of posting, and the degree of adaptation to the partners’ foreign language competence. On the other hand, we consider the development of negotiated contents in dialogs and the occurrence of conflicts. We found that failed communication was not in the form of conflicts, but in form of lost opportunities for communication, which were not related to cultural communication styles, but to the interaction strategies used by different individuals, the moment of posting, and particular circumstances of the project.
12: 00 - 13: 0060 mins
12: 00 - 13: 0060 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Hungry people
Individual sessionLunch
13: 00 - 13: 4040 mins
13: 00 - 13: 4040 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Kaufmann
Individual sessionFull paper (40 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
With the largest population of English language learners in the world at just over 400 million and the fastest growing economy, China is a hotbed for English infusion. While several researchers have examined Beijing and Hong Kong (Wang,2013; Graddol,2012) few have studied the linguistic attributes of smaller cities. After cataloguing the usage of English at various sites around Shaoxing, China, a template can be made for future studies in the region. The instructor has utilized a flipped classroom methodology in empowering the students as ethnographic researchers in their own neighborhood! The group projects made use of collaborative writing websites for virtual exchange: www. wikispaces. com and Docs. qq. com. Through this tool students are able to log in and modify their research papers at any time and view real-time feedback from their advisor, thus, enabling everyone to draft the paper collaboratively from anywhere in the world! The instructor can also view statistics on page views, revisions, and engagement in discussion questions to grade participation fairly. In fact, through the use of this tool and videoconferencing sessions the instructor was able to participate in a convention in the US and facilitate classes in China. While most of the classroom activities were conducted synchronously, this talk will explore the potential of conducting it asynchronously. Furthermore, the nature of doing ethnographic research is a novel approach that empowers students as primary researchers in an ever-changing environment becoming increasingly westernized. Students chose a site, devised a research question, performed ethnographic research, interviewed people at the site, analyzed the results of their findings, and discussed the implications of their research. Some of the sites include: Starbucks, Walmart, Pizza Hut, train station, university campus, and tourist site. The research questions generally related to the usage of English at the site and perceptions held about the usage of English by Chinese and non-Chinese alike. An English linguistic landscape (Blommaert,2014) was created and analyzed through pictures, field notes, and interviews. Finally, the implications of the studies related to reducing the amount of Chinglish at the sites, modifying qualifications and training for staff members, improving perceptions of the sites, and examining changes in students’ perceptions.
13: 45 - 14: 4560 mins
13: 45 - 14: 4560 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Jianlin
Keynote speechKeynote (60 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
This lecture, based on the social-cultural perspectives of language learning, talks about the changes in IT-based FLLM in Big Data Era and their implications on the foreign language teaching (FLT) reform in China. The arguments in the lecture are presented in terms of the changes in IT-based FLLM, majorly covering these issues: (a) the features and functions of Big Data in all aspects of human society; (b) the rapid growth and changes of Big Data and their impacts on the birth and development of internet; and (c) Big Data as the triggers on the FLT reform and IT-based growth of FLLM in China. The lecture discusses the above issues majorly from the social cultural perspectives, triggering some reflections on the inadequacies of the present language education and FLT and raising some hot issues for further research.
14: 15 - 14: 4025 mins
14: 15 - 14: 4025 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Watanabe
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Virtual exchange pedagogy
Technology has moved online virtual exchange forward. Several proposals have been made in order to enrich learners’ intercultural strategies (e. g. Newton,2016). From my own experience, starting from so-called, “big c” cultures and gradually proceeding to “little c” ones would be a realistic instructional technique. It is also prospective to take various current social issues and have learners induce serious self-reflection about their own values. Politically neutral topics, such as bullying, junk-food, smoking, global warming, etc. work fine. On the other hand, political ones, such as territorial disputes, war-time responsibilities, historical perceptions, etc. are considered too sensitive to be addressed. However, learners’ political statements that might result in heavy fire on the Internet do occur in exchange. This is inevitable since political resolutions/decisions are closely related with each culture. How teachers coordinate our learners, giving some preliminary instructions to our learners and reacting promptly and flexibly to the messages posted, toward fruitful discussion is the keys for the deeper intercultural understanding. This is especially the case in the Asia-Pacific region. In my presentation, I’d like to show teachers should admire naïve sentiment of ordinary citizens and take a firm global stance, free from any stereotypes and prejudices in the exchange. Newton, J. (2016). Cultivating intercultural competence in tertiary EFL programs. Crossing Borders in Language Teaching and Business Communication: Proceedings of the 11th ELT conference at AE CYUT. (pp. 1-22). Chaoyang University of Technology, Chaoyang, Taiwan,27 May 2016. ISBN978-986-5631-24-6
14: 40 - 14: 5515 mins
14: 40 - 14: 5515 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Coffee and tea lovers
Individual sessionCoffee Break
14: 55 - 15: 2025 mins
14: 55 - 15: 2025 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Shen
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Intercultural studies
This brief paper attempts to suggest the potential usefulness of selected identity theories in Intercultural Communication for the purposes of literary study. Intercultural Communication can be defined as the symbolic exchange process whereby individuals from two or more different cultural communities negotiate shared meanings in an interactive situation. Over the past three decades or so, the field of Intercultural Communication in the U. S. and Europe has seen a proliferation of theories, research methods, and concomitant paradigms. In China, the field has developed even faster in recent years, and scholars have found that the study of Intercultural Communication has witnessed a history of booming growth. Such intercultural cases in several ethnic writings can be observed in the identity theories in Intercultural Communication. The cultural conflicts and identity anxiety as vividly described in literary works, could be newly interpreted in the perspective of Intercultural concepts of identity, thus voluntarily generate new interpretations for literature.
15: 25 - 15: 5025 mins
15: 25 - 15: 5025 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Wang, Liu
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)Using virtual exchange
Under the current situation of economic globalization, the simple interflow within one country is now incapable to meet the needs of the development of times. Especially college and university students have a large demand for intercultural communication competence in China. Scholars have tried generous research methods to cultivate ICC under a domestic context and attach importance to network teaching. Online platforms pull students out from traditional face-to-face communication and provides a learning environment without time and place restriction. With the construction of international platforms, a real intercultural communicating condition has been provided to students for improving ICC and English skills. This study adopts online teaching method and designs a new multiform course mode that consists of two online platforms. And 11 classes of 330 students are randomly chose to be observed in this study. All of them were enrolled in a four-month course on Intercultural Communication in the spring semester of 2017 at a science and technology university in China. Students are being divided into two groups, Group A is 5 classes’ students are being cultivated in new course mode and Group B is the other 6 classes under the traditional classroom teaching mode. Through analyzes of the variation of two groups students’ ICC after the course finish, this study aims to find if the special course mode would help in developing ICC among college students who stay in a domestic context. Base on the findings, some valuable suggestions could be extracted for future online learning platform construction. With both qualitative and quantitative approaches, this research adopts mixed methods, questionnaires, online platform observations and students’ reflective journals to test students’ Cultural Intelligences changes before and after they have had the Intercultural Communication course. This research summarizes the characteristics of the improvement of ICC among sample students and finds the effectiveness of the multiform course mode which not only contains online learning platforms that provide students a real context to practice their ICC, but also an interview task that guide them to communicate with people from different cultures. The findings also provide basis and reference for future ICC cultivation, especially on the construction of online ICC cultivating platform to a certain extent.
15: 50 - 16: 0010 mins
15: 50 - 16: 0010 mins
Room TBA50 seats
Using virtual exchange
Individual sessionShort paper (25 minutes)
Last modified: Friday, 5 April 2019, 3:28 PM